Hue Go

My latest purchase is a Hue Go.  It’s a rechargeable (and therefore totally mobile) version of a Philips Hue bulb, encased in a bowl shaped frosted enclosure.

After a 1 and a half hour charge the light is good to go for 3 hours.  There’s a build in ‘bulge’ stand to allow for it to be pointed towards a surface, like the Iris or the Bloom.

What makes the light more usable for the whole family is that there’s a button on it to cycle through moods and colours, and to switch the light on or off.  The moods include such campness as Warm white, Cozy candle and Night adventure (which has a pink hue and a heart icon, I wonder what that mood is for…)

I like it, and think it’s going to make a great addition to the 20 or so Hue lights we already have.  For one thing, it can be moved in the dry to a balcony table – perfect for the approaching summer nights.

bowl2From a home automation point of view, there may be issues with having the light in ‘mobile’ mode, i.e. unplugged.  According to the literature, the light switches from ‘standby’ to ‘off’ after 2 hours of inactivity when in battery mode, so I’m guessing that means even if an ‘on’ command is sent, it won’t respond until either plugged in again or the button is pressed.  Obviously this is a fail-safe to ensure the battery does not drain completely.

£80 puts the Hue Go at the same price point as the Lightstrips, and I can see why.  It’s well made and even looks pretty when in standby mode.  I like the modern, ‘glossy glass’ look of the front panel and this continues even to the back where the understated function button resides.

The pros far outweigh the cons though, especially as after testing the Hue Go with the homemade disco controller I made, it is very responsive to commands even when in battery mode.

The brightness and saturation (although not seen well in these pictures) is as expected for a Hue product – read: amazing,

The literature seems to suggest that on battery mode, the brightness is reduced to extend battery life.  I can’t say I’ve noticed that, unless they mean that when displaying the pre-set moods that feature is enabled.

The charging cable (reminiscent of a cable for the Living Colours lamps) looks strong enough to be plugged and unplugged regularly.  The charging port on the unit itself is also recessed quite a distance which is good for protection purposes.

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Overall, a great product and another reason to get excited about Hue!

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9 thoughts on “Hue Go”

  1. Hi,

    I’m interested in a Hue Go and have a Domoticz setup. Before I take the plunge can you confirm that when in battery mode and it goes from standby to “OFF” that it can be turned on again by Domoticz?

    Thanks,

    Paul

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    1. Hi, thanks for the question. As soon as Hue Go changes from Standby to Off, it stops listening for signals so the only way to turn it back on is either to plug it back in to a power source or press the switch on the back.

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      1. You could get around this – if you wanted to keep the Hue Go in ‘standby’ for as long as the battery would allow, you can set a timed LUA script from Domoticz to send an ‘On’ then ‘Off’ command to the Hue Go if Domoticz knows that the Hue Go is not in use.

        If a colour is set and the Hue Go is on, it stays on until it detects that the battery is too low.

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      2. Thanks for the replies. I intend to mostly use the Hue Go in the hallway and it will activate when the front door is opened for a couple of minutes and then turn off. Your workaround could work for this? It won’t be near a power source but if this could potentially last on the battery for 90 door openings I could charge it once a week without it running out of power.

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  2. I’m not sure how long the Go would last on ‘Standby’ mode. I would think that it would last at least half a week, maybe more. And my workaround would work as it would keep the Go active, maybe once every hour. Have you considered the LightwaveRF LED lights? They are battery powered, very bright and last for ages. Obviously you can control them with Domoticz too.

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  3. I wasn’t aware of the LightwaveRF LED lights. I can’t seem to find them in stock and available to purchase online anywhere. Any ideas?

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